Bluetti vs. Goal Zero – Solar Generator Matchup (In-Depth)

While Goal Zero has been at the core of the solar generator world for nearly a decade, several cutting-edge companies have established themselves as true competitors to Goal Zero in recent years. One of the current leaders in the industry is Bluetti, and they’ve been innovating their solar generators seemingly on a yearly basis.

Since solar generator technology as a whole has improved significantly in a short span of time, I decided to compare four different Goal Zero and Bluetti power stations to each other to find out which company made the best off-grid power solutions.

Bluetti’s solar generators are better than Goal Zero’s (when comparing similar models) due to their higher AC output performance, consistently faster recharging speeds, longer-lasting batteries, higher number of output port options, and overall cheaper cost.

As you’ll see in the comparisons, Bluetti’s power stations are each unique and only share a few similar qualities to one another. This is not the same case for Goal Zero’s “X” series because they share several of the same qualities (except for battery capacity).

Below are the models I compared from each company, starting from smallest to largest. Feel free to jump to a later comparison for more powerful matchups first.

Goal Zero Yeti 500X vs. Bluetti AC50S vs. Bluetti EB55

ModelProsCons
Yeti 500X1. Lightweight
2. High surge power
3. 60W USB-C PD
1. Expensive
2. Average cycle life
3. Slow AC charging
AC50S1. Inexpensive
2. 11 total outputs
3. High cycle life
1. Low AC output
2. Low-powered DC5521 ports
3. Sub-par LCD screen
EB551. 13 total outputs
2. High cycle life
3. High input/output power
1. Heavy
2. Sub-par LCD screen
3. Only 1x high-powered USB

The Bluetti EB55 is better than the Bluetti AC50S and Goal Zero Yeti 500X because it has twice the AC output power of the others (700W vs. 300W), the most output port options (13 total), and the highest battery cycle life of its competition (2,500 cycles to 80% capacity).

Model/SpecsGoal Zero Yeti 500XBluetti AC50SBluetti EB55

Goal Zero Yeti 500X Portable Power Station, 505-Watt-Hours Portable Lithium-Battery Emergency Power Station, Solar-Powered Generator

BLUETTI Portable Power Station AC50S 500Wh Solar Generator Lithium Battery Backup with 2x110V/300W AC Outlets Power Generator for Outdoor Camping RV Home Use Emergency

BLUETTI EB55 Portable Power Station 700W 537Wh LiFePO4 Battery Pack Solar Generator with 4 AC Outlets, 100W USB-C, Regulated 12V DC, Emergency Backup Power for Outdoor Camping Home Vanlife

AC Output (Max)300W (1,200W surge)300W (450W surge)700W (1,400W surge)
Solar Input (Max)150W120W200W
Battery Capacity505Wh500Wh537Wh
Battery Cycle Life500 cycles to 80% capacity1,000 cycles to 80% capacity2,500 cycles to 80% capacity
Weight12.9 lbs13.6 lbs16.5 lbs
Dimensions7.5 x 11.3 x 5.8 in11.6 x 7.5 x 7.7 in10.9 x 7.9 x 7.8 in
Warranty24 months24 months24 months
Price (Subject to Change)$700$370$500
User ManualYeti 500X manualAC50S manualEB55 manual

Output ports

Each portable power station in this comparison has different overall output port options:

  • Yeti 500X: 8 total
  • AC50S: 11 total
  • EB55: 13 total

AC outputs

The Yeti 500X and Bluetti AC50S both have two AC ports rated at 300W continuous. However, their surge ratings are entirely different. The Yeti has 1,200W of maximum surge while the AC50S has 450W.

As for the Bluetti EB55, it carries four AC ports with a rating of 700W continuous with a 1,400W max surge.

For clarification, these ratings are for all of the AC ports combined for each power station.

USB & wireless

The two Bluetti models share similar ports but with different power outputs. The AC50S has four USB-A ports, a 45W USB-C, and one 10W wireless charging pad.

The Bluetti EB55 has the same four USB-A ports, but a 100W USB-C and a 15W wireless charging pad.

With four total USB port options, the Yeti 500X has two USB-As, one 18W USB-C, and one 60W USB-C PD port that serves both as an output and charging input.

12V DC ports

There are two 12V outputs on the Yeti 500X:

  • 1x 6mm port (for Goal Zero accessories): 120W max
  • 1x regulated car port: 120W max

The AC50S and EB55 share the same regulated 12V car port output (120W max). Both models also have two DC5521 outputs each, but with different ratings:

  • AC50S: 2x DC5521 (12/3A)
  • EB55: 2x DC5521 (12V/10A)

Charging times

battery charging animation

Each solar generator model has about 500Wh of battery capacity, but they recharge in different time spans mainly due to their contrasting solar panel inputs and wall chargers.

Solar panels

Using any of Goal Zero’s 100W-rated solar panels, the Yeti 500X will recharge in 6-12 hours depending on sunlight conditions. Using a 200W solar panel, such as the Boulder 200 Briefcase, it will recharge in 3-6 hours according to Goal Zero.

The maximum solar panel input for the 500X is 150W.

For more information on Boulder solar panels, I wrote an article on the three variations from Goal Zero here: 3 Stages of Camping Solar Panels from Goal Zero | Pure Power Solar.

The AC50S has a maximum charging rate of 120W from solar and you can use two different Bluetti solar panels to charge it up depending on your preference. The PV120 panel (Amazon link) recharges the system in 5-6 hours, while the PV200 panel (Amazon link) takes about 4-4.5 hours to recharge the AC50S.

With the highest solar input of 200W, the EB55 model can recharge in as little as three hours. Using the PV120 takes 6-6.5 hours, while the PV200 takes 4-4.5 hours. Since most solar panels tend to output an average of 70-80% of their rated output, you can take advantage of this by using about 300W of solar panels on the EB55.

At 70% efficiency, 300W of solar will bring you about 210W of actual power output, which the EB55 will bring down to 200W via its MPPT charge controller.

Wall charging

BLUETTI 200W AC Adapter + DC7909 to XT-60 Female Cable, Compatible w/ EB55/EB70S/EB70 Portable Power Station, Dual-Charging EB55 Solar Generator
Bluetti EB55 200W wall charger

Each power station in this comparison has different wall charging times with their included chargers, as seen below:

  • Yeti 500X: 10 hours (60W charger)
  • AC50S: 6 hours (90W charger)
  • EB55: 3.2 hours (200W charger)

The Yeti 500X has the option to upgrade to a 120W charger, which takes about 4.5 hours to recharge the system. As for the EB55, you can purchase an additional wall charger and use both of them to recharge it in 1.8-2.3 hours.

In the same 1.8-2.3 hours, you can also use 200W of solar input combined with the EB55’s wall charger to fast-charge it.

Car charging

All three power stations charge from 4.5-6 hours from a 12V/10A (120W) car charger:

  • Yeti 500X: 4.5 hours
  • AC50S: 5-5.5 hours
  • EB55: 6 hours

Both Bluetti models come with a car charger, but the Goal Zero model doesn’t.

Unique features

Goal Zero Yeti 500X

  • Lightweight (12.9 lbs)
  • High AC-port surge rating (1,200W) compared to continuous output (300W)
  • Has two recharging inputs on the front and rear for versatility

Bluetti AC50S

  • High battery cycle life for lithium-ion battery type (1,000 cycles to 80%)
  • Wireless charging pad
  • LED light with three modes

Bluetti EB55

  • LiFePO4 battery with 2,500 cycles to 80% capacity
  • ECO mode: AC inverter turns off if using under 20W after four hours (saves battery life)
  • 200W max solar input (above average)
  • 700W continuous AC output (above average)

Which is better overall?

Solar Generator Model/SpecsYeti 500XAC50SEB55
Highest Battery CapacityX
Highest Battery Cycle LifeX
Most Port OptionsX
Highest-Powered AC PortsX
Highest Solar InputX
Lightest WeightX
Cheapest CostX

Surprisingly, the Bluetti EB55 costs $200 less than the Yeti 500X even though it outperforms it in nearly every category besides weight.

The closest solar generator to the specs of the EB55 is the EcoFlow River Max. I own this power station and it has a similar AC output and solar panel input. One feature that the River Max has that the EB55 doesn’t is a mobile app to control and monitor it. You can read more about it in my review post here: EcoFlow River 600 Review – Testing My River Max + Comparisons.

For more information on the EB55, I recommend reading my review of it where I compare it to additional models: Test & Review: Bluetti EB55 Solar Generator (In-Depth).

I own the EB55 and bought it on Bluetti’s website. If you’re interested in this system, I recommend checking out my affiliate links below.

Bluetti AC200P vs. Goal Zero Yeti 1500X

ModelProsCons
Bluetti AC200P1. High cycle life
2. 17 total outputs
3. Fast recharging times
1. Heavy
2. Low-powered DC5521 ports
3. Only one USB-C
Goal Zero Yeti 1500X1. Powerful 12V ports
2. Fast solar charging
3. Pairs with Yeti App
1. Slow AC charging
2. Expensive
3. Low cycle life

The Bluetti AC200P is better than the Goal Zero Yeti 1500X because it costs $500 less while having 7x the battery cycle life (3,500 vs. 500 cycles), seven additional output ports, and a faster AC charging speed by a factor of three (4.5 vs. 14 hours).

Model/SpecsBluetti AC200PGoal Zero Yeti 1500X

BLUETTI Portable Power Station AC200P, 2000Wh LiFePO4 Battery Backup w/ 6 2000W AC Outlets (4800W Peak), Solar Generator for Outdoor Camping, RV Travel, Home Use (Solar Panel Not Included)

Goal Zero Yeti 1500X Portable Power Station, 1516Wh Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, 2000W Portable AC Inverter Generator, Outdoor Portable Generator, Portable Solar Generator for Solar Panels

AC Output (Max)2,000W (4,800W surge)2,000W (3,500W surge)
Solar Input (Max)700W600W
Battery Capacity2,000Wh1,516Wh
Battery Cycle Life3,500 cycles to 80% capacity500 cycles to 80% capacity
Weight60.6 lbs45.6 lbs
Dimensions16.5 x 11 x 15.2 in15.3 x 10.2 x 10.4 in
Warranty24 months24 months
Price (Subject to Change)$1,500$2,000
User ManualAC200P manualYeti 1500X manual

Output ports

Although each power station has different output options, the Bluetti AC200P has a total of 17 outputs, which is seven more than the Yeti 1500X’s ten port options.

AC outputs

Sharing a 2,000W continuous power output, the AC200P and Yeti 1500X can power several high-powered appliances like vacuums, microwaves, and space heaters.

However, the AC200P has a 4,800W surge maximum while the 1500X has a 3,500W maximum. Depending on what you’re powering with these power stations, the AC200P can better protect itself from excessive surges from appliances.

The AC200P also has six AC ports, while the Yeti 1500X has just two.

Similar: What Can a Solar Generator Power? (Charging, Capacity, and More)

USB & wireless

As for advanced recharging methods, the AC200P has two wireless recharging pads – each capable of 15W max.

Besides these ports, the USB port options are below for each model:

Yeti 1500X:

  • 2x USB-A (12W max)
  • 1x USB-C (18W max)
  • 1x USB-C PD input/output (60W max)

AC200P:

  • 4x USB-A (15W max)
  • 1x USB-C (60W max)

As you’ll see with the bigger models in this post, the Goal Zero power stations carry the same USB ports throughout their power stations while each Bluetti model’s USB technology differs.

12V DC ports

This is one of the more interesting sections to analyze because each power station has four options to choose from; plus, all of their 12V ports are regulated.

Here are their ports with specifications:

Bluetti AC200P

  • 2x 12V/3A DC5521 ports (36W max)
  • 1x 12V/10A car port (120W max)
  • 1x 12V/25A RV port (300W max)

Yeti 1500X

  • 2x 12V/10A 6mm ports (120W max)
  • 1x 12V/13A car port (160W max)
  • 1x 12V/30A High Power Port (360W max)

The Yeti 1500X clearly takes the advantage here due to its car port and High Power Port outputting higher maximum wattages than the AC200P’s car port and RV port.

Charging times

The wall charging and solar panel charging options are the ideal methods to use for both solar generators. You’ll see that the AC200P is versatile in its different charging options, while the 1500X has a more straightforward approach.

Solar panels

The AC200P and 1500X have fast recharging times from solar. I estimated their recharging times when their maximum input is achieved below:

  • Yeti 1500X: 2.5-3 hours (600W)
  • AC200P: 3-3.5 hours (700W)

The AC200P’s battery is 500Wh bigger than the 1500X and takes longer to charge up even with a 100W higher solar input.

Both companies listed their estimated charging times with their own 200W solar panels – the AC200P using the PV200 panel and the 1500X using the Boulder 200 panel.

Yeti 1500X:

  • 2x Boulder 200: 4-8 hours
  • 4x Boulder 200: 3-4 hours

AC200P:

  • 4x PV200: 3.5 hours

The AC200P has an additional feature that allows you to recharge from solar panels and its wall charger at the same time. This totals a maximum of 1,200W and can recharge the power station in as little as 2.2 hours.

You also don’t have to use the same solar panels from the company that makes the solar generator. I use my two Elecaenta 120W solar panels to charge most of my power stations and it works great. It came with several types of adapters to use with different solar generators.

Wall charging

Both power stations come with a wall charger, however, they have different outputs that drastically alter their recharging times.

The Yeti 1500X includes a 120W wall charger which takes 14 hours for a full charge. The AC200P comes with a 500W wall charger that takes about 4.5-5 hours to fully recharge its battery.

This is a downside of the Yeti 1500X because Bluetti’s EB55, which is 1/3 the size of the Yeti 1500X, has a wall charger that’s 80W more powerful.

However, you do have the option of purchasing a 230W or 600W AC charger for the 1500X. The 230W charger takes about seven hours for a full charge and the 600W version takes about three hours for a full charge.

In a similar fashion, the AC200P has a fast-charging option where you can purchase a second 500W charger and dual-charge the power station in 2.5-3 hours from the wall.

Car charging

Using a 12V car charger, the AC200P takes 20 hours to charge up compared to the Yeti 1500X’s 14 hours. This is not the ideal way to charge either power station since:

  1. The AC200P charges much slower from car charging compared to its other methods
  2. The Yeti 1500X charges from the car in the same timespan as its AC charger, but the car charger is sold separately

Unique features

Bluetti AC200P

  • Port covers on every input and output port
  • LiFePO4 battery with 3,500 cycles to 80% capacity
  • LCD touchscreen with multiple settings
  • Dual AC charging and solar+AC charging options (1,100-1,200W input)
  • Battery expansion: can pair with B230 or B300 batteries (how-to video) for increased capacity

Yeti 1500X

  • Pairs with phone/tablet via Yeti App 3.0
  • Battery expansion: pairs with Yeti Tank batteries via ports underneath its lid
  • High-powered 12V ports: car port (160W) and Powerpole port (360W)
  • Can connect to home circuits with Yeti Home Integration Kit (video)

Which is better overall?

Solar Generator Model/SpecsAC200PYeti 1500X
Higher Battery CapacityX
Highest Battery Cycle LifeX
More Port OptionsX
Higher-Powered AC PortsX
Higher Solar InputX
Lighter WeightX
Cheaper CostX

The AC200P is about 15 pounds heavier than the Yeti 1500X due to its larger battery capacity and LiFePO4 battery. This type of battery allows the AC200P to last longer than lithium-ion types, but they are generally heavier.

If you want to get the AC200P, I recommend getting a hand truck, dolly, or wagon to assist you with moving it around. Its 60 pounds may be too heavy for one person to carry. Two people can carry it with its two handles though, so it depends on your situation.

Similar: Bluetti AC200P vs Titan Solar Generator – Which Is More Dominant?

Goal Zero Yeti 3000X vs. Bluetti AC300+B300

ModelProsCons
Goal Zero Yeti 3000X1. Powerful 12V ports
2. Pairs with Yeti App
3. Comes with roll cart
1. Same ports as 1500X
2. Slow AC charging
3. Low cycle life
Bluetti AC300+B3001. Long cycle life
2. Powerful inputs/outputs
3. Pairs with Bluetti App
1. Heavy
2. No roll cart included

The Bluetti AC300+B300 beats the Goal Zero Yeti 3000X in AC output (3kW vs. 2kW) and recharging speeds from both AC (2.2 vs. 14 hrs) and solar charging (1.8 vs. 6 hrs). The AC300 has nearly 2x the output ports of the 3000X (19 vs. 10) and its battery cycle life is 7x higher (3,500 vs. 500).

Model/SpecsGoal Zero Yeti 3000XBluetti AC300+B300

Goal Zero Yeti 3000X Portable Power Station, 2982Wh Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, 2000W Portable AC Inverter, Outdoor Portable Generator, Portable Solar Generator for Solar Panels

BLUETTI Expandable Power Station AC300 and B300 External Battery Module, 3072Wh LiFePO4 Battery Backup w/ 6 3000W AC Outlets(6000W Peak), Solar Generator For Home Backup, Vanlife, Emergency

AC Output (Max)2,000W (3,500W surge)3,000W (6,000W surge)
Solar Input (Max)600W2,400W
Battery Capacity3,032Wh3,072Wh
Battery Cycle Life500 cycles to 80% capacity3,500 cycles to 80% capacity
Weight69.8 lbs127.2 lbs
Dimensions15.3 x 10.2 x 13.6 in20.5 x 12.5 x 24.6 in
Warranty24 months48 months
Price (Subject to Change)$3,500$3,400
User ManualYeti 3000X manualAC300 manual
B300 manual

Output ports

As the “X” series portable power stations get bigger from Goal Zero, their output port options stay the same. With Bluetti’s models, the opposite is true.

AC outputs

The Yeti 3000X has the same two AC outputs as the Yeti 1500X (2,000W continuous, 3,500W surge). The AC300+B300 has an AC inverter capable of 3,000W continuous (6,000W surge).

Using this power are six 20A standard AC ports and one 30A NEMA TT-30 port, the latter of which is typically used with RVs and travel trailers.

USB & wireless

As with the 1500X and 500X variants, the Yeti 3000X has the same four USB options:

Yeti 3000X

  • 2x USB-A (12W max)
  • 1x USB-C (18W max)
  • 1x USB-C PD input/output (60W max)

The AC300 and B300 each have USB ports with a combined total of nine outputs (including wireless charging):

AC300+B300

  • 2x USB-A (15W max)
  • 3x USB-A (18W max)
  • 2x USB-C (100W max)
  • 2x wireless charging pads (15W max)
Bluetti AC300+B300 front view
The Bluetti AC300+B300 has most of its output ports on the AC300, but the B300 contains additional outputs on its front side.

12V DC ports

Both the Yeti 3000X and AC300+B300 have regulated 12V ports, but their port options differ significantly:

Yeti 3000X

  • 2x 12V/10A 6mm ports (120W max)
  • 1x 12V/13A car port (160W max)
  • 1x 12V/30A High Power Port (360W max)

AC300+B300

  • 1x 12V/10A car port (120W max)
  • 1x 24V/10A car port (240W max)
  • 1x RV port 12V/30A (360W max)

Charging times

The charging times of these two systems are radically different. The AC300+B300 outperforms the Yeti 3000X in both solar and wall charging capabilities.

Solar panels

Since the Yeti 3000X continues to share its 600W maximum input from the Yeti 1500X, it charges in a reasonable time for most but lacks the impressive fast-charging flare that the Bluetti AC300 is capable of.

Compared to its smaller variant, the AC200P, the AC300 is capable of over three times more solar input power.

Yeti 3000X

  • At max input (600W): 6 hours
  • 4x Boulder/Nomad 200: 6-9 Hours
  • 6x Boulder/Nomad 200: 6 Hours

The above solar panel pairings are made to be realistic in most conditions. You can connect six 200W solar panels (1,200W) to the 3000X, but it will only accept 600W max. The extra solar panels are meant to compensate for cloudy days.

AC300+B300

  • At max input (2,400W): 1.8 hrs
  • 4x PV350: 3-4 hrs
  • 8x PV350: 1.8-2 hrs

The AC300 has two solar input ports (each capable of 1,200W). Each input port has its own MPPT charge controller, which is not common in solar generators. The Point Zero Energy Titan is one of only a few other power stations to have two MPPT charge controllers.

Wall charging

AC charging is equally as impressive as solar input power for the AC300 system. The same cannot be said about the Yeti 3000X, but it still manages to have decent recharging times.

With its 1,800W charger, the AC300 can recharge the B300 in as little as 2.2 hours. You can also buy a second charger and get 3,000W of power for a 1.5-hour charge time. If you want to charge partially from the wall and from solar panels, you can do so as long as the input doesn’t exceed 3,000W.

The Yeti 3000X uses a less-powerful 230W AC charger for a 14-hour charging time. You can choose to upgrade to a 600W charger for a six-hour recharging time, which is actually pretty outstanding considering the size of its battery.

Car charging

Using a car charger for either of these power stations is going to result in a very slow charging process compared to the other options, but you can do so on both systems if desired.

Unique features

Yeti 3000X

  • Comes with a roll cart with a telescoping handle
  • Pairs with phone/tablet via Yeti App 3.0
  • Battery expansion: pairs with Yeti Tank batteries via ports underneath its lid
  • High-powered 12V ports: car port (160W) and Powerpole port (360W)
  • Can connect to home circuits with Yeti Home Integration Kit

AC300+B300

  • LiFePO4 battery with 3,500 cycles to 80% capacity
  • Battery expansion: can connect up to 4x B300 batteries (12kWh+)
  • 2,400W max solar input (highly uncommon)
  • 1,800W standard AC charging input w/ option for dual AC charging (3,000W)
  • Can pair 2x AC300s to an AC300 Bluetti Fusion Box for 6,000W of output at 240V
  • Can tie to home grid for UPS (uninterruptible power supply)
  • LCD touchscreen and pairs mobile device to Bluetti App
  • 4-year warranty

Which is better overall?

Solar Generator Model/SpecsYeti 3000XAC300+B300
Higher Battery CapacityX
Highest Battery Cycle LifeX
More Port OptionsX
Higher-Powered AC PortsX
Higher Solar InputX
Lighter WeightX
Cheaper CostX

Both of these solar generators are similar in price, but clearly, the Bluetti model is superior. That being said, the AC300 and B300 are very heavy and don’t come with a roll cart. The AC300 weighs 50 pounds and the B300 weighs 80 pounds, so a hand truck or cart can be very handy. While adding images to this article I stumbled upon a trolley that is made by Bluetti (Amazon link) for their large power stations. It costs about $120.

Bluetti EP500 vs. Goal Zero Yeti 6000X

ModelProsCons
Bluetti EP5001. Long cycle life
2. Powerful inputs/outputs
3. UPS & peak load shifting functions
1. Very heavy
2. Only one USB-C
3. Less powerful than AC300
Goal Zero Yeti 6000X1. Pairs with Yeti App
2. Can integrate w/ home circuits
3. Massive battery capacity
1. Slow solar charging
2. Slow wall charging
3. Expensive

The Bluetti EP500 beats the Goal Zero Yeti 6000X due to its higher solar input (1,200W vs. 600W), higher battery cycle life (6,000 vs. 500 cycles), and advanced BMS. Both power stations have mobile apps, but the EP500 has both UPS and peak load shifting functions, whereas the Yeti 6000X doesn’t.

Model/SpecsBluetti EP500Goal Zero Yeti 6000X

BLUETTI Power Station EP500, 5100Wh LiFePO4 Battery Backup, 2000W Solar Generator, 1200W Max Solar Input w/ 4 AC Outlets (4800W Peak), in/Off-Grid Seamless UPS for Home Use, Black Out Emergency

Goal Zero Yeti 6000X Portable Power Station, 6,071-Watt-Hours Portable Lithium-Battery Generator with 2,000-Watt AC Inverter, Solar Generator for Indoor and Outdoor Use

AC Output (Max)2,000W (4,800W surge)2,000W (3,500W surge)
Solar Input (Max)1,200W600W
Battery Capacity5,100Wh6,071Wh
Battery Cycle Life6,000 cycles to 80% capacity500 cycles to 80% capacity
Weight167 lbs106 lbs
Dimensions22.8 x 11.8 x 29.9 in15.3 x 10.1 x 17 in
Warranty60 months
24 months
Price (Subject to Change)$4,600$6,000
User ManualEP500 manualYeti 6000X manual

Output ports

The Yeti 6000X is identical to the 3000X and 1500X in terms of output ports, whereas the Bluetti EP500 has a unique layout of outputs compared to the previous Bluetti models discussed.

AC outputs

The EP500 shares the same AC inverter output as the AC200P, while the Yeti 6000X shares its output with the Yeti 3000X and 1500X.

  • EP500: 4x ports 2,000W (4,800W)
  • Yeti 6000X: 2x ports 2,000W (3,500W)

USB & wireless

With five USB options and two wireless charging pads, the EP500 outpaces the Yeti 6000X’s USBs, which are the exact same as the previous three models in this post:

EP500

  • 2x USB-A (15W max)
  • 2x USB-A (18W max)
  • 1x USB-C (100W max)
  • 2x wireless charging pads (15W max)

Yeti 6000X

  • 2x USB-A (12W max)
  • 1x USB-C (18W max)
  • 1x USB-C PD input/output (60W max)

12V DC ports

The 12V ports on the 6000X continue to follow its smaller versions’ layouts:

Yeti 6000X

  • 2x 12V/10A 6mm ports (120W max)
  • 1x 12V/13A car port (160W max)
  • 1x 12V/30A High Power Port (360W max)

As for the EP500, it has the same 12V port options as the AC200P but most of them are more powerful:

EP500

  • 1x 12V/10A car port (120W max)
  • 2x 12V/10A DC5521 ports (120W max)
  • 1x 12V/30A RV port (360W max)

All 12V ports on both systems are regulated.

Charging times

Goal Zero Yeti 6000X Portable Power Station, Portable Lithium-Battery Emergency Power Station, Includes 2 Compatible Boulder 200 Briefcase Solar-Generator Portable Solar Panel Kits
Yeti 6000X with two Boulder 200 solar panels

The solar input of the Bluetti EP500 as well as its ability to charge from solar and the wall simultaneously help to give it overall faster recharging times than the Yeti 6000X.

Solar panels

The Bluetti EP500 is nearly 1,000Wh smaller than the Yeti 6000X in terms of battery capacity, but it has double the solar input power.

Yeti 6000X

  • Max input (600W): 10.5 hrs
  • 800W (4x Boulder/Nomad 200): 11-18 hours
  • 1,200W (6x Boulder/Nomad 200): 11-12 hours

EP500

  • Max input (1,200W): 4.5 hours
  • 4x PV350: 5-7 hours
  • 5x PV350: 4.5-6 hours

Wall charging

Both power stations share the same AC wall charging output of 600W. However, the Yeti 6000X has a larger battery than the EP500, which gives it a longer charging duration.

  • EP500: 8.5 hours (600W)
  • Yeti 6000X: 12 hours (600W)

Following the trend of the smaller Bluetti power stations, the EP500 can be charged from the wall and from solar panels simultaneously, totaling 1,800W (max). At this rate, its 5,100Wh battery recharges in three hours.

Car charging

As with the 3,000Wh models, car charging is not recommended for these models unless you intend to slow charge them.

Unique features

Bluetti EP500

  • LiFePO4 battery with 6,000 cycles to 80% capacity
  • Can pair 2x EP500s to Bluetti Fusion Box for 4,000W output at 240V
  • Can tie to home grid for UPS (uninterruptible power supply) and peak load shifting
  • LCD touchscreen and pairs mobile device to Bluetti App
  • Dual solar + AC charging (1,800W max)
  • 6-year warranty

Yeti 6000X

  • Pairs with phone/tablet via Yeti App 3.0
  • Battery expansion: pairs with Yeti Tank batteries via ports underneath its lid
  • High-powered 12V ports: car port (160W) and Powerpole port (360W)
  • Can connect to home circuits with Yeti Home Integration Kit
  • Surprisingly lightweight for its battery capacity

Which is better overall?

Solar Generator Model/SpecsEP500Yeti 6000X
Higher Battery CapacityX
Highest Battery Cycle LifeX
More Port OptionsX
Higher-Powered AC PortsX
Higher Solar InputX
Lighter WeightX
Cheaper CostX

The EP500 is a unique solar generator system because of its advanced BMS. It has all of the other traits that a large solar generator should have, but its UPS function and peak load shifting capabilities are very hard to find in other models.

If you want to read about the EP500 in detail, I wrote a post on this power station as well as the EP500Pro, which isn’t yet available on Bluetti’s website. Check it out here if interested: Bluetti EP500 & EP500Pro Review – Longest-Lasting Solar Generators.

Conclusion

It’s clear from my analysis that Bluetti power stations are significantly better than Goal Zero’s when comparing similar models. Of course, there are multiple models not featured in this post, but the general consensus is that Bluetti’s power stations are less expensive, better performing, and longer-lasting than Goal Zero’s.

Two models from Bluetti that I didn’t feature here are the EB150 and EB240. These power stations are a bargain because they came out before all of the models I mentioned here in this post. That being said, they have several qualities that make them highly versatile to this day.

I compare them both to another great model, the EcoFlow Delta 1300. This power station is both powerful and plentiful in port options, so it’s a good system to compare.

Check them out below:

Max Peters

Hi! I'm Max and I am passionate about off-grid solar technology and adventure! I'm using my knowledge of solar generators, solar panels, and everything in between to provide you with the best tools to keep you powered while off the grid. Read more about me here: About Max Peters."

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